Archive for ‘Announcements’

ACU Doctor of Ministry Program Offers Unique Opportunity

by   |  01.09.18  |  Announcements

Current Doctor of Ministry students and alumni will meet at Saint John’s Abbey this coming March for a course titled “Living in the Tradition”. The course will be taught by GST’s Director of Contextual Education and Assistant Professor of Practical Theology, Dr. Brady Bryce. 

Over the course of five days, students will attend daily prayers with the Benedictine monks, explore the spirituality of ministers, and grow closer with a community of other ministers and friends. The course will also allow students to experience Christian traditions different than their own in deep and meaningful ways.

According to the Dr. Bryce, “This is an opportunity for separation from routine, from media, from familiar surroundings in order to seek God.”

The Abbey is located on 2,740 acres of woodlands and lakes, just 90 miles from the Twin Cities in Minnesota. To get a better feel for the splendor of the campus, take a virtual tour here.

Dr. Carson Reed, Director of the Doctor of Ministry program, believes this course fits in with our vision of grounding the program in contextual learning and reflective action. Dr. Reed says, “the Living in the Tradition course is a wonderful example of placing ministers and leaders in a particular context to learn about a way of prayer. More importantly, it creates the space for ministers to ask about their own particular contexts—churches and communities—and how those contexts are sacred and full of the presence of God.” More »

GST Faculty Update 2017

by   |  10.11.17  |  Announcements

I am continually amazed how our GST faculty engage in local church ministry. Of course, there are the obvious activities that everyone sees including church consultations and seminars, interim ministries, Elderlink, writing curriculum, and publishing articles and books that serve the life of the church. Yet, there are also those week-to-week engagements with local churches working as elders, Bible class teachers, and ministry leaders. For example, Fred Aquino can be found most Sunday mornings preaching at the Avenue B Church of Christ in Ballinger. Chris Flanders is often found these days preaching at the Maryneal Church of Christ. Mindi Thompson is a frequent Bible adult class teacher at the Highland Church of Christ in Abilene. And the list continues.

For the past four years, Jeff and Linda Childers were High School Huddle leaders for the Highland Church of Christ. Jeff recently told me, “Having the same batch of teenagers into our home every week during their high school years has been a highlight. From the silly to the sublime and the very serious, my wife Linda and I have been privileged to walk alongside an extraordinary group of youngsters on their journey into young adulthood.”

Mark Hamilton talked with me about his work as an elder at University Church of Christ. While being an elder at a church has many demands, he shared with me one part of the work he found especially joyful.  “Samjung and I have served with the campus ministry at UCC, spending a lot of time with students, mentoring some, teaching as needed, and trying to encourage our various campus ministers. We met with those students every Sunday evening for over five years. Last year was a transitional year for us as we stepped back from campus ministry (though we ran a small group chapel on campus on Thursdays for about a dozen UCC students and their friends).  We transitioned to the 20-somethings group, which Bradley Steele [GST alum] is leading.”

I appreciate working with world-class scholars. Spending time with them on a weekly basis for twenty years has shaped my thinking about God and the church in profound ways. More importantly, I am blessed to watch how they integrate the life of the mind with their daily walk with God and the church. I hear them pray and watch them pastor others. I am a witness to how my fellow GST faculty commit themselves to academic pursuits and the vocation of scholarship as a service to the church. How much more so is that service blessed as they also serve the church with their hearts and hands.


Tim Sensing More »

Errett Award

by   |  03.20.17  |  Announcements

Abilene Christian University Student Wins Isaac Errett Award

Bradley Steele of Abilene Christian University provided the winning paper for the 2017 competition titled: “The Lord’s Supper in the Thought of Barton Stone and Alexander Campbell.” Bradley will present his paper at a parallel session during the 2017 SCJ Conference at Johnson University Tennessee. The $250 prize, provided by the Disciples of Christ Historical Society, will be presented to Bradley at the conference by the directors of the competition, Newell Williams of Brite Divinity School and Doug Foster of Abilene Christian University.

Eucharist and Ecclesiology: Essays in Honor of Dr. Everett Ferguson

by   |  02.23.17  |  Announcements

You’re invited to the special release of the new book Eucharist and Ecclesiology: Essays in Honor of Dr. Everett Ferguson at 7 p.m. TuesdayMarch 7, presented by ACU’s Center for the Study of Ancient Texts.

This robust collection of essays was gathered from a 2013 event on ACU’s campus in which eminent scholars from different religious traditions gathered to honor world-renowned specialist in Early Christianity and retired ACU professor, Dr. Everett Ferguson.

CSART is proud to celebrate the publication of this book in a special event, featuring responses by Ferguson and the book’s editor, Dr. Wendell Willis, professor of Bible, missions and ministry.

Attendees will have the opportunity to purchase the book and have it signed by both Willis and Ferguson at a reception afterward.

We hope to see you there!

Dr. Jeff Childers
Director, Center for the Study of Ancient Religious Texts More »

Aquinas Colloquium

by   |  02.20.17  |  Announcements

Aquino invited to give a keynote lecture at Oxford University

Dr. Frederick Aquino of the Graduate School of Theology at ACU has been invited to give a keynote lecture at the Aquinas Colloquium, “Aquinas and Newman on Conscience” (see resource here).

The colloquium will take place on March 4, 2017 at Blackfriars Hall, Oxford. It will launch the joint research project of the Aquinas and the Las Casas institutes: Human Nature & Dignity: Resources for the 21st Century. In this colloquium, the speakers will compare and contrast the thought of Thomas Aquinas and John Henry Newman on the nature of conscience and some of its key facets (e.g., rights; responsibilities) that the church and state must foster.

Aquino’s keynote lecture will focus on Newman’s account of conscience while exploring the relevance of his thought for the joint research project on human nature and dignity.

The Association of Theological School Reaffirms GST’s Accreditation

by   |  02.20.17  |  Announcements

On February 15, 2017, ATS reaffirmed the accreditation of Abilene Christian University Graduate School of Theology for a period of ten years (fall 2026). The reaffirmation also includes the GST’s residency programs in Croatia, Ghana, Swaziland, and Addison. ATS additionally granted approval to offer comprehensive distance education through ACU-Dallas.

The GST faculty were affirmed to maintain the exemplary level of faculty scholarship that was evident in their extensive research and writing. ATS noted the generous scholarships that enhanced the student’s experience at ACU resulting in a graduate theological education that is very affordable for an increasing number of students.

Finding a Voice for Chrysostom

by   |  02.13.17  |  Announcements

Dr. Jeff Childers of the Graduate School of Theology has been invited to present research at Università Tre in Rome at the conference, “Tradurre Tradire Tramandare—Translate Mislead Transmit: The Greek Fathers Between Latin Western and Syriac Eastern Worlds” (20-21 February 2017). As a guest of the university, Professor Childers will present research on the topic, “Finding a Voice for Chrysostom: the Syriac Versions of a Greek Preacher.” Childers explains, “Chrysostom was the most popular preacher in the ancient church. He wrote in Greek, but his interpretations of scripture were translated into Syriac very early. My research shows how Syriac translators naturalized the Greek orator into a ‘native’ semitic speaker through the art of translation.”

CSART Presents

by   |  01.20.17  |  Announcements

Jonah: Interpreted, Reinterpreted, and Interred

How a small biblical story became prominent in early Christian art

You are invited to join us on the campus of Abilene Christian University for the presentation: “Jonah—Interpreted, Reinterpreted, and Interred.” This lecture will explore how a small biblical story became prominent in the early Christian art of the ancient Catacombs and elsewhere.

The lecture will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, in ACU’s Chapel on the Hill, at the Onstead-Packer Biblical Studies Building. Dr. Wendell Willis, longtime New Testament professor in ACU’s Department of Bible, Missions, and Ministry, will be the speaker.


by   |  11.06.16  |  Announcements

Local news highlighted the Carmichael-Walling Lectures saying,

Abilene Christian University celebrated the inauguration of the Center for the Study of Ancient Religions Texts, or CSART on Thursday. The center strives to inspire students and help them conduct research alongside established scholars. On Thursday, manuscripts that were written as long as 1700 years ago were featured.

Read more here.

Carmichael-Walling Lectures

by   |  10.07.16  |  Announcements

You are invited to join us for the inauguration of ACU’s Center for the Study of Ancient Religious Texts and the 30th annual Carmichael-Walling Lectures at Abilene Christian University on Thursday, Nov. 3.

Father Justin of Sinai will give the Carmichael-Walling Lectures –Encounters in the Desert: Holy Books and Sacred Texts – as part of an inaugural celebration featuring special events, distinguished speakers, and an opportunity to see rare book and manuscript treasures.


  • 10 a.m.: Father Justin (St. Catharine’s Monastery) — “Illustrating the Ladder of Divine Ascent: An Illuminated Manuscript of a Spiritual Classic (Sinai Greek 418)”
  • 1 p.m.: Dr. Mark Hamilton (Abilene Christian University) — “Who’s Afraid of Ancient Texts? Rediscovering Old Words for a New Era”
  • 2 p.m.: “Texts as Teachers: Reports on Current Scholarship at ACU” (CSART researchers)
  • 4 p.m.: Father Justin, “Newly Recovered Manuscripts of the Scriptures from Saint Catherine’s Monastery, Sinai”
  • 7 p.m.: Father Justin, “‘For Moses Wrote of Me’: Reflections From Mount Sinai”
  • 8 p.m.: CSART reception

In collaboration with the Museum of the Bible and the Special Collections and Archives of ACU’s Brown Library, a select number of rare books and ancient manuscripts will be on display.

Father Justin (pictured at left, top) is librarian in the Monastery of St. Catharine at Mount Sinai, Egypt, one of the oldest Christian institutions in the world. He studies and cares for some of the most important manuscripts and artifacts in existence anywhere.

Mark Hamilton (pictured at left, bottom) serves as the Onstead Professor of Biblical Studies at Abilene Christian University. He is the author or editor of numerous books and articles focusing on Israelite conceptions of society within their ancient Near Eastern context, as well as on biblical theology.

Lectures are free, open to the public and will take place in the Onstead-Packer Biblical Studies Building on ACU’s campus. For more information, contact Jeff Childers at More »

Reconciliation Reconsidered

by   |  08.12.16  |  Announcements

Dr. Jerry Taylor and Dr. Doug Foster recently contributed to Reconciliation Reconsidered, a new book from ACU Press addressing the conversation of race in Churches of Christ. Read an excerpt from Taylor’s chapter, “Well Water,” on the ACU Press blog.

Reconciliation Takes Time.

A broad racial divide mars Churches of Christ, and courageous leaders from across the United States have joined together to listen to one another. Rather than adopt a posture of resignation, they have met for honest, God-honoring conversation.

In Reconciliation Reconsidered, Tanya Brice pulls together the early fruit she has gleaned from this ongoing conversation about racial reconciliation. Learn about yourself in the context of community as you explore these key ideas:

  • Exercise truth-telling: it’s what is needed before any reconciliation can happen
  • Discover how race relations are not as simple as you think
  • Challenge your stereotypes
  • Understand the meaning of current events like the Ferguson shooting in fresh ways
  • Revisit Christ’s teachings with a careful eye toward discipleship and love of your neighbor

Each chapter concludes with discussion questions that can help you and others navigate this perplexing and difficult topic.

New Publication

by   |  07.31.16  |  Announcements

This summer Dr. Jeff Childers of the Graduate School of Theology published a translation and study of Jacob of Sarug’s Homilies on Praise at Table (Texts from Christian Late Antiquity 46; Gorgias Press, 2016).

New Publication by James Thompson

by   |  02.22.16  |  Announcements

Following his excellent commentary on Hebrews in the Paidea series, James Thompson’s forthcoming commentary on Philippians in the same series is now available for pre-order. Philippians and Philemon by James Thompson and Bruce Longenecker, Paideia: Commentaries on the New Testament, is scheduled for and August 2016 release by Baker Academic.

From the publisher: “Two respected senior New Testament scholars examine cultural context and theological meaning in Philippians and Philemon in this addition to the well-received Paideia series. Paideia commentaries explore how New Testament texts form Christian readers by attending to the ancient narrative and rhetorical strategies the text employs, showing how the text shapes theological convictions and moral habits, and making judicious use of maps, photos, and sidebars in a reader-friendly format. Students, pastors, and other readers will appreciate the historical, literary, and theological insights offered in this practical commentary.”

Philippians and Philemon is a welcome addition to Thompson’s other contributions to Pauline scholarship. His other books include the trilogy Pastoral Ministry according to Paul, Moral Formation according to Paul, and The Church according to Paul. 

Thompson is scholar in residence at the Graduate School of Theology and is currently working on a Pauline theology.

Carmichael-Walling Lectures

by   |  10.15.15  |  Announcements, GST Events

Please join us fCW2015or the 29th annual Carmichael-Walling Lectures at Abilene Christian University. Lectures are free and open to the public, and will take place in Room 114 of the Onstead-Packer Biblical Studies Building on Thursday, November 12, 2015. For more information, contact Jeff Childers at ACU’s Graduate School of Theology:

Scripture & Women in the Apocalypse: Revelation’s Allusive Text

Dr. Adela Yarbro Collins
4:00 p.m. Intertextuality in the Book of Revelation
7:30 p.m. Women as Symbols in the Book of Revelation

The book of Revelation is rich in both Scriptural allusion and symbolic imagery.  The first lecture will provide an overview and critical assessment of scholarship on intertextuality in Revelation, highlighting the book’s use of Scripture.  The second lecture will consider female symbols in Revelation, particularly focusing on the symbolic woman of Revelation 17 often referred to as “The Whore of Babylon.”

About the Speaker:

Zurich photoDr. Adela Yarbro Collins is Buckingham Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation Emerita, Yale Divinity School. She previously taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Notre Dame, and McCormick Theological Seminary. She has served as President of the Society of New Testament Studies, regional President of the Society of Biblical Literature, and on a number of editorial boards. Her recent publications include King and Messiah as Son of God. Eerdmans, 2008 (co-authored with John J. Collins); Mark: A Commentary. Fortress, 2007; “Rewritten Prophets: The Use of Older Scripture in Revelation,” in Poetik und Intertexualität, ed. Stefan Alkier et al., 2015; and “The Transformation of Paul’s Apocalyptic Ideas in the First Two Centuries,” in Revealed Wisdom, ed. John Ashton, Brill, 2014.


CHARIS Lectures: Dr. Anthony R. Cross

by   |  10.10.15  |  Announcements

Oxford scholar, Dr. Anthony R. Cross, will be on campus October 12-13 for a series of lectures on baptism. “Knowing God through Experience: Insight into Baptist Baptismal Spirituality through Personal Testimonies,” will take place at Chapel on the Hill on Monday, Oct. 12 from 4:30pm-6:00pm. A response by Dr. Everett Ferguson, ACU Distinguished Scholar in Residence, will follow. Refreshments will be served.

“The Sacrament of Baptism Among the First Baptists,” will take place in the Biblical Studies Building, room 130 on Tuesday, Oct. 13 from 11:45am-12:45pm. A response by Dr. Doug Foster, ACU Professor of Church History, will follow. RSVP for lunch to

Broom Colloquium

by   |  10.08.15  |  Announcements, GST Events

‘Jamie, The Very Worst Missionary’ to speak

Posted October 07, 2015 Former missionary and popular blogger Jamie Wright will speak at this year’s Broom Colloquium on Oct. 28 and 29, hosted by ACU’s Halbert Institute for Missions.

Wright is perhaps best known for her blog, “Jamie, The Very Worst Missionary,” which she describes as a collection of “inappropriate remarks, embarrassing antics, and generally lame observations from an American missionary.” Through her blog and speaking engagements, she uses humor to honestly describe her life as a missionary and mother, and to discuss Christian culture.

Wright’s topic for the colloquium will be “Missions, Justice and Social Media: Can Twitter, Instagram and Facebook Really Change the World?” She will discuss how students can channel their compassion and social responsibility in the world of social media.

Sessions are scheduled for 11 a.m. Oct. 28 in Moody Coliseum and 7 p.m. Oct. 29 in Hart Auditorium. Both sessions are open to the public.

The colloquium, held annually since 2007, is a campus conversation that encourages the ACU community to relate global issues to God’s mission in the world. It is named in honor of the legacy of Wendell and Betty Broom. Wendell Broom was a longtime missions professor and one of the first Church of Christ missionaries to receive advanced academic training in missiology.

See Wright’s blog: More »

ACU Dallas by Mindi Thompson

by   |  08.21.15  |  Announcements

Every time I think of you, I give thanks to my God.  

Whenever I pray, I make my requests for all of you with joy,

for you have been my partners in spreading the Good News

about Christ from the time you first heard it until now.  

And I am certain that God, who began the good work within you,

will continue his work until it is finally finished on the day when Christ Jesus returns. More »

National Festival Of Preachers

by   |  08.21.15  |  Announcements

Hello Texas Friends of the Academy of Preachers

I want to be sure and connect you with one of the finest Young Preachers in your state and in the history of the Academy of Preachers, Larry Terrell Crudup, AoP’10.  Terrell is hosting the 2015 Texas Festival of Young Preachers at his home church, Sweet Home Baptist Church, in Round Rock Texas on Saturday Oct. 24.

This is a new experience for the Regional to be hosted in a church and we couldn’t be more excited!  Won’t you join us for a one day experience like non-other?  We’ll begin at 10 a.m. and end by 7 p.m. all on Saturday October 24.  Abilene Christian University hosted the event in March of 2014.

Schedule and registration:

Encourage others by sharing the  AoP video:

Blessings, More »

Introducing Kester Smith

by   |  06.29.15  |  Alumni, Announcements

The ACU Graduate School of Theology is pleased to announce that Kester Smith has joined our staff as the GST Recruiter.

Kester is a recent GST graduate, having completed his MDiv. in May. Prior to pursuing an MDiv, Kester worked as a teacher, youth minister, and, most recently, a bi-vocational church-planter and bookseller in Austin, TX. This combination of ministry and GST experience make Kester an invaluable asset for understanding the calling of those considering theological education and how the GST might best serve that calling.

Kester is married to Rachel Smith, who works as an Instructor and Clinical Supervisor in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Kester and Rachel have one son, Harrison, who will be a 6th grader at Craig Middle School this coming fall.

We asked for an informal interview with Kester, in order to get to know him a little better.


  1. Food – When I was still eating meat, it was my mom’s chicken potpie. Now that I’m a vegetarian it’s either a spicy yellow tofu curry (Krua Thai serves a great one) or my chickenless version of my mom’s pot pie. My favorite “on the go” food is a potato, egg, and cheese breakfast taco.
  2. Song – People that know me will be shocked that it isn’t a Bruce Springsteen song, but they probably wouldn’t be considering my love for hymns. My favorite song is either “Amazing Grace,” “Come Thou Fount,” or “Be Thou My Vision.” Were Springsteen to record acoustic versions of any of those songs, my head would explode.
  3. Book – Not to give the obvious answer, but the Bible truly is my favorite book. With that as a given, my favorite novel is either Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov or Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead. My favorite authors (besides Dostoevsky and Robinson) include Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Flannery O’Connor, Abraham Heschel, Toni Morrison, N.T. Wright, and pretty much every member of the Inklings. I’m also partial to the writings of Maximus the Confessor and Julian of Norwich. I like books a lot.
  4. Movie/television show – My favorite film is It’s A Wonderful Life. My favorite television show is probably The Simpsons, as long as we’re talking about the early seasons.
  5. Vacation spot – I was raised in Chicago and it is still my favorite place to visit, when I have the chance to travel. I’d like to visit Ireland, England, and Scotland some day, but haven’t yet been able to afford the trip.

Either/Or More »

The Mdiv Is Now Offered Online

by   |  03.05.15  |  Announcements

Students interested in advanced ministry training at Abilene Christian University will soon have a new online option. Starting this summer, the ACU Graduate School of Theology will offer the Master of Divinity degree online.

“The GST has always been called to serve the church for the sake of the world,” said Dr. Mindi Thompson, director of distance education for the Graduate School of Theology. “Now, we are even better equipped to fulfill that calling by offering the Master of Divinity online.”

A Master of Divinity is a professional graduate degree designed to prepare students for careers in ministry. Graduates are equipped to serve as congregational ministers, Christian educators, campus ministers, chaplains, church planters, and in various other ministry contexts.

Historically, students interested in earning an M.Div. or other advanced theological training at ACU were required to move to Abilene to earn their degree. “In some cases, we know that asking students to pick up their lives and relocate for graduate work also asks them to put their ministry careers on hold,” said Dr. Tim Sensing, associate dean of the ACU Graduate School of Theology.

ACU was recently granted permission by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) to offer the Master of Divinity degree online. Now, students will be able to complete the majority of their coursework online.

The program requires 72 credits and is designed to be completed in 48 months by students who are also working full or part time. Online courses will be offered in a seven-week format, and students will complete one course at a time over a seven-week period. More »

Congratulations Students

by   |  02.02.15  |  Announcements

Jacob of Serugh

by   |  01.24.15  |  Announcements

Dr. Jeff Childers, the Carmichael-Walling Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity in the Graduate School of Theology at ACU, has been invited to participate in a special workshop occurring at Princeton University in January 2015. A group of eight scholars from places such as Holland, Israel, and the U.S. will gather as guests of the university for a workshop-conference on Jacob of Serugh. Jacob (d. 521) was a Christian bishop whose extensive writings greatly influenced Christianity in the Middle East. Jacob wrote in Syriac and worked in a district now located in southeast Turkey near the Syrian border. Although his surviving works number into the hundreds and his legacy left a deep impact on Christianity in the region, our knowledge of Jacob is still at an early stage. A growing number of researchers, students, and even a popular readership are taking an interest in this creative author and leader. In an effort to help put our knowledge of this important figure on a more solid footing, specialists are gathering at Princeton this month to discus key topics related to Jacob’s legacy. Childers has been invited to present original research on Jacob of Serugh’s treatment of the New Testament text. Jacob’s sermons and letters are saturated with references to scripture and his brilliant treatment of the biblical text remains one of the most attractive features of his work.

Divining Gospel

by   |  12.07.14  |  Announcements

Dr. Jeff Childers, the Carmichael-Walling Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity in the Graduate School of Theology at ACU, has been invited to lecture in Norway in December 2014. A select group of scholars from various parts of the world will gather as guests of the Norwegian School of Theology in Oslo in a conference entitled, The Bible as Notepad. This conference focuses on the ways in which ancient Bibles were read, edited, and marked up by actual users over the centuries. In his lecture, “Divining Gospel,” Childers will present original research on a unique Syriac Bible from the sixth century that also contains a complicated fortune-telling apparatus alongside the Gospel text. Comparing Greek, Latin, Coptic, Armenian, and Georgian sources, Childers has found that there was once a very lively trade in using Gospel books as fortune-telling guides to life, until it was suppressed by church authorities and practically stamped out of existence.

GST Announces Affordability Initiative

by   |  11.26.14  |  Announcements

Commitment to churches is a priority at Abilene Christian University. A new affordability initiative, which launches next summer in ACU’s Graduate School of Theology, is the latest in a series of efforts to build upon that commitment.

Beginning in the 2015-2016 academic year, the ACU Graduate School of Theology will roll out a program pricing plan designed to reduce the cost of its master’s programs and make a graduate theological education more accessible to those considering a career in ministry.

Under the program pricing model, tuition will be calculated as a fixed price based on a student’s degree program.

“In setting the tuition rate for a particular program, program pricing allows us to consider both the cost to deliver a degree program and a student’s future earning potential,” Tim Sensing, associate dean of the Graduate School of Theology said. “Program pricing will also allow us to consider a student’s need for financial support and to make the best use of our scholarship resources.”

The plan will reduce the cost of the Master of Divinity, Master of Arts in Christian Ministry, Master of Arts in Global Service, and other Master of Arts programs by approximately 41 percent based on current tuition. Additionally, students will lock in a fixed program tuition rate for their degree that will not increase as long as they are continuously enrolled.

“Our affordability initiative in the Graduate School of Theology is the latest step toward ACU’s commitment to serving churches,” Ken Cukrowski, dean of the College of Biblical Studies said. “We know that ministers serve in contexts where they may earn less than other professions and we are committed to helping ministers graduate with less debt. Doing so helps reduce the burden of financial pressures and allows ministers to serve more effectively in churches and other ministry contexts.”

In addition to a reduction in tuition, the ACU Graduate School of Theology offers generous scholarship support. “In 2014, virtually every student received some form of scholarship support,” Sensing said. More »

Hot Off the Press

by   |  08.29.14  |  Announcements

Congratulations to James Thompson on his new book The Church According to Paul: Rediscovery Community Conformed to Christ. The book is a wonderful addition to his other titles also published by Baker Academic (Pastoral Ministry according to Paul; Moral Formation according to Paul; Preaching Like Paul; and Hebrews). See Baker Academic Press.

The reviews are in and the verdict is plain, you will be blessed by this book.

“James Thompson, always with one foot planted firmly in the academy and the other in the church, has given us a highly insightful, theologically rich, and timely study of the apostle Paul’s view of the church—one of the best Pauline ecclesiologies in print. Thompson argues compellingly that Paul’s first-century vision of the church as a distinctive community speaks clearly to the twenty-first century. This excellent volume should be studied not only by students of Paul, but also by all who are (rightly) concerned about the identity and mission of the church today.”

Michael J. Gorman, St. Mary’s Seminary & University, Baltimore, Maryland

The Church according to Paul is as challenging as it is clever. It is clever because Thompson takes contemporary visions of the church and replaces the language of their proponents with Paul’s own language, thereby upturning today’s categories. It is challenging because it virtually dares those who are concerned with the state of the church today to rethink the church according to the mind of Paul. All in all, The Church according to Paul is a useful and quite valuable read for anyone interested in either the church or the Bible, perhaps even both.”

Raymond F. Collins, Brown University More »

Quick Look at the GST’s Degree Offerings

by   |  08.25.14  |  Announcements

Our program is built on the fine reputation of our faculty and the quality of the curriculum. I am often asked about the various degree offerings. Below are several pdf brochures describing the various GST degrees.

Contact us today if you are interested in pursuing a masters degree with the Graduate School of Theology.