Summer Faculty Institute 2016

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Given the centrality of food in Christian practice and imagination, what might it mean to “eat well” in our teaching, learning, and scholarship? How might eating as a metaphor enlarge our thoughts and shape the ways we organize our classrooms, plan our syllabi, prepare our lessons, write our articles, and live in our academic communities?

We invite you to join us for a 3- day Faculty Institute, May 16-18!  We’ll kick off with a keynote from Dr. Susan Felch, Director of the Center for Christian Scholarship at Calvin College —  “Food for Thought”  — on Monday at 11:30, and then host two concurrent workshops with four sessions each:
Monday (1:30-3:30)
Tuesday (9:00-11:00; 1:00-3:00)
Wednesday(9:00-11:00).

No cost for ACU faculty/adjuncts.

Cost for faculty outside the ACU system:
Keynote only $25 per person
Full Summer Faculty Institute $100 per person [Click here to register]
Group of 20 or more from one institution $75 per person (call for details)

The workshop descriptions are below.

Finding your Scholarly Vocation with Dr. Susan Felch
The purpose of this workshop is to develop your self-understanding as a scholar, to understand habits and practices that support continuing scholarly work, and to explore the breadth and benefits of Christian scholarship.  Each of the three workshop sessions will include a presentation, discussions, and the opportunity to share ongoing scholarly work. Short articles and other readings will be distributed in advance.

Creating Flipped Classrooms
Scores of studies have demonstrated that the flipped classroom structure is beneficial for student learning, especially for first generation and underrepresented students. This hands-on series of workshops will prepare you to deliver one of your classes using the flipped model and try it for yourself.

Please RSVP by April 29.

 

Active Learning Activities: Give Me Three Steps and Think-Draw-Pair

Written by David Christianson

Active learning isn’t about fun. It’s about engagement. It’s about doing something with information beyond intake and producing output. It’s about producing output right now, in the moment, and not waiting for a paper due in two weeks or a test on Thursday. Students are great at active learning, but they need instructors to provide the opportunity and a direction for it. Here are two activities to produce active learning in your class.


Name: Give Me Three Steps

Who: Partners or groups of 3-4

Time: 4-6 minutes

Process: Give learners 1 step instructions. “Everyone please stand up and wait for directions.” After they have stood, direct the learners to take a set number of steps, depending on the size and mobility of the room, in any direction. For example, “Everyone please take seven steps in any direction, then wait for more information. Once they have stepped, have learners partner up (or get in a group of three to four) and give them a question to discuss or something to review. For example, “Now, find the person that is nearest you and partner up. Once you do that, discuss this question. How did the Sykes-Picot Agreement at the end of the First World War contribute to the current conditions in the Middle East today?”

Purpose: One of the problems with not doing active learning activities is simple inactivity. Comfort is not compatible with engagement, so breaking that cycle of comfort and inviting movement can transition students from a state of comfort to one of attention.

Adapted from Jensen (2003).

 


 Name: Think-Draw-Pair

Who: Pairs

Time: 5-10 minutes

Process: Instruct learners to draw a visual representation of an important concept you are addressing. This drawing can take the form of a cartoon, a diagram, or whatever they think of to represent the concept. Give them at least 5 minutes, but no more than 10, to complete the drawing. Then, have them partner with someone else and explain the drawing to that student.

Purpose: Vision trumps all of the other senses (Medina, 2009). When learners create their own interpretation of a concept in a visual form, they create a better understanding than they would otherwise (Schwamborn, et al, 2010). In this version of the old Think-Pair-Share activity, learners don’t just discuss – they visualize. As they share it with someone else, they then verbalize their conceptualization and may identify holes in their thinking, allowing them to wrestle with the concept even more. And, of course, they may learn something new from their learning partner that they hadn’t realized about the concept.

Adapted from Jensen (2003).

Active Learning Activities: Note Share & Tweet This

Written by David Christianson

Active learning isn’t about fun. It’s about engagement. It’s about doing something with information beyond intake and producing output. It’s about producing output right now, in the moment, and not waiting for a paper due in two weeks or a test on Thursday. Students are great at active learning, but they need instructors to provide the opportunity and a direction for it. Here are two activities to produce active learning in your class.


Name:  Note Share

Who:  Either assigned partners or random pairings with a person next to them.

Time:  2-3 minutes

Process:  Have learning partners critique each other’s notes on the section you just covered. What are their partners missing? What did their partners record that they didn’t? Do they seem to understand the main points?

Purpose:  This activity produces quick repetition of the material, which is good for memory. It also allows students a chance to ask questions to a peer and gain a better understanding of difficult material. Students have to analyze the information on their partners notes, which allows a platform for deeper learning.

Adapted from Silberman and Jensen.


Name:  Tweet This

Who:  Partners or groups of three

Time:  3-6 minutes

Process:  Have partners or groups write a tweetable (140 characters or less) summary of a main point or important piece of information. For as many in the class that use Twitter, ask them to tweet it. If you want to limit it even further, use a hashtag such as #COMS211 so it is trackable on Twitter and they can learn from each other.

Purpose:  This activity gets students to succinctly summarize. There is nothing magical about using Twitter as opposed to some other output, except that Twitter does limit the length of the post. This activity adds another emotional element (feeling challenged) to the information, which is a powerful memory enhancer.

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