Phase 1 Banner 9 Update Scheduled

0 Commentsby   |  03.16.17  |  Uncategorized

What is changing?

The first phase of major improvements to Administrative Banner are coming in early April.  Most know “Administrative Banner” by one or more of the following names: Big Banner, Internet Native Banner, INB, Banner-Banner and Oracle Banner.  The next generation of the Banner platform, known as Banner 9, will significantly improve your ability to use Banner.  Once all phases of the project are completed, Banner will be completely web-based with no Java requirement. The Phase 1 update includes:

  1. Application Navigator – This new navigation component will help users navigate between Internet Native Banner and the new Banner 9 forms.
  2. Banner General – Forms that begin with the letter G will move to the new web-based interface with Banner 9.
  3. Banner Human Resources – Forms that begin with the letters P, N and xxx will move to the new web-based interface with Banner 9.

We plan to upgrade all of the Banner modules to Banner 9 by the end of 2017, which will require significant work in the coming months.

How can I learn more?

Here are some actions you can take to learn more about the upcoming changes:

  • Information sessions – If you haven’t already, please attend one of the remaining Banner 9 information sessions that are highlighted in the weekly myACU News emails for employees.
  • Frequently asked questions – We have answered the most common Banner 9 questions in a frequently asked questions page that is accessible through the quicklinks in myACU.

 

February 2017

0 Commentsby   |  03.07.17  |  Uncategorized

February 2017 by the numbers:

  • 161 end-user support requests resolved
  • 84 development and administration issues resolved
  • 99 development and administration issues created
  • projects in-progress
  • project completed
  • 3 projects requested
  • 99.97% average uptime
  • 146 people attended Banner 9 information sessions

Security Tips for Traveling at Home and Abroad

We all like to travel with our mobile devices (smartphones, laptops, or tablets) — whether it’s to the coffee shop around the corner or to a café in Paris. These devices make it easy for us to stay connected while on the go, but they can also store a lot of information — including contacts, photos, videos, location, and other personal and financial data — about ourselves and our friends and family. Here are some ways to protect yourself and others.

Banner XE is Banner 9

Ellucian announced in early February that Banner XE, the next major update, has been rebranded as Banner 9, which is the version number associated with the new release.  Our first set of updates for Banner have been delayed as a result of critical issues that we identified in late February.  We hope to announce a go-live date in the next few weeks.

What else is going on?

  • Banner projects – We are in the midst of multiple projects related to the Banner 9 updates, including finalization of the first phase of updates as well as planning the next phases (Finance, Human Resources and Student).  We are also working on multiple development projects to migrate some of our custom Banner forms into the new Banner 9 interface.
  • Data integration maintenance – We have been working on multiple data integration maintenance projects, which includes Activity Insight (Provost’s Office), Reeher (Advancement), and Follett (ACU Online).
  • Financial Aid – We are working with our colleagues in Student Financial Services to prepare for personnel transitions as well as tasks related to the 2017-2018 financial aid awarding cycle.

 

Security Tips for Traveling at Home and Abroad

0 Commentsby   |  03.03.17  |  Security

We all like to travel with our mobile devices (smartphones, laptops, or tablets) — whether it’s to the coffee shop around the corner or to a café in Paris. These devices make it easy for us to stay connected while on the go, but they can also store a lot of information — including contacts, photos, videos, location, and other personal and financial data — about ourselves and our friends and family. Following are some ways to protect yourself and others.

Before you go:

  • If possible, do not take your work or personal devices with you on international trips. If you do, remove or encrypt any confidential data.
  • For international travel, consider using temporary devices, such as an inexpensive laptop and a prepaid cell phone purchased specifically for travel. (For business travel, your employer may have specific policies about device use and traveling abroad.)
  • Install a device finder or manager on your mobile device in case it is lost or stolen. Make sure it has remote wipe capabilities and that you know how to do a remote wipe.
  • Ensure that any device with an operating system and software is fully patched and up-to-date with security software.
  • Makes copies of your travel documents and any credit cards you’re taking with you. Leave the copies with a trusted friend, in case the items are lost or stolen.
  • Keep prying eyes out! Use strong passwords, passcodes, or smart-phone touch ID to lock and protect your devices.
  • Avoid posting social media announcements about your travel plans; such announcements make you an easy target for thieves. Wait until you’re home to post your photos or share details about your trip.

While you’re there:

  • Physically protect yourself, your devices, and any identification documents (especially your passport).
  • Don’t use an ATM unless you have no other option; instead, work with a teller inside the bank. If you must use an ATM, only do so during daylight hours and ask a friend to watch your back. Also check the ATM for any skimming devices, and use your hand to cover the number pad as you enter your PIN.
  • It’s hard to resist sharing photos or telling friends and family about your adventures, but it’s best to wait to post about your trip on social media until you return home.
  • Never use the computers available in public areas, hotel business centers, or cyber cafés since they may be loaded with keyloggers and malware. If you use a device belonging to other travelers, colleagues, or friends, do not log in to e-mail or any sensitive accounts.
  • Be careful when using public wireless networks or Wi-Fi hotspots; they’re not secure, so anyone could potentially see what you’re doing on your computer or mobile device while you’re connected.
  • Disable Wi-Fi and Bluetooth when not in use. Some stores and other locations search for devices with Wi-Fi or Bluetooth enabled to track your movements when you’re within range.
  • Keep your devices with you at all times during your travels. Do not assume they will be safe in your hotel room or in a hotel safe.

When you return:

  • Change any and all passwords you may have used abroad.
  • Run full antivirus scans on your devices.
  • If you used a credit card while traveling, check your monthly statements for any discrepancies for at least one year after you return.
  • If you downloaded any apps specifically for your trip and no longer need them, be sure to delete those apps and the associated data.
  • Post all of your photos on social media and enjoy reliving the experience!

 

(This content was provided by Educause.)

January 2017

0 Commentsby   |  02.07.17  |  Uncategorized

January 2017 by the numbers:

  • 173 end-user support requests resolved
  • 89 development and administration issues resolved (new record for month of January)
  • 94 development and administration issues created
  • projects in-progress
  • project completed
  • 4 projects requested
  • 99.97% average uptime

Learn What It Takes to Refuse the Phishing Bait!

Cybercriminals know the best strategies for gaining access to our sensitive data. In most cases, it doesn’t involve them rappelling from a ceiling’s skylight and deftly avoiding a laser detection system to hack into servers; instead, they simply manipulate a community member. There are a few ways to identify various types of social engineering attacks and their telltale signs.

Coming Soon: New and Improved Banner

Computing Services will introduce the first phase of major updates to administrative Banner later this month.  Most know “administrative Banner” by one or more of the following names: Big Banner, Internet Native Banner, INB, Banner-Banner and Oracle Banner. The next generation of the Banner platform, Banner 9 (formerly known as Banner XE), will significantly improve the use of Banner, with Java no longer required once all project phases are completed.  We are providing information sessions to help prepare users for the upcoming changes. Please see our separate post for more details regarding the first phase release.

What else is going on?

  • Banner updates – We plan to upgrade all of the administrative Banner modules to Banner 9 (formerly known as Banner XE) by the end of 2017. In addition to work related to the Phase 1 release later this month, we are preparing for the next phases of work, which include Finance, Human Resources and Student.
  • Personnel change – We are excited to announce that one of programmers, Riley Wills, has been promoted to a title of Senior Programmer.  This promotion recognizes Riley’s years of programming experience and his role mentoring both student and professional staff members.
  • Spring maintenance work – We have multiple maintenance projects underway, including data integration updates, preparation for the 2017-2018 financial aid awarding cycle, and security patch updates of key systems.

 

Learn What It Takes to Refuse the Phishing Bait!

0 Commentsby   |  02.01.17  |  Uncategorized

Cybercriminals know the best strategies for gaining access to our sensitive data. In most cases, it doesn’t involve them rappelling from a ceiling’s skylight and deftly avoiding a laser detection system to hack into servers; instead, they simply manipulate a community member.

According to IBM’s 2014 Cyber Security Intelligence Index, human error is a factor in 95 percent of security incidents. Following are a few ways to identify various types of social engineering attacks and their telltale signs.

  • Phishing isn’t relegated to just e-mail! Cybercriminals will also launch phishing attacks through phone calls, text messages, or other online messaging applications. Don’t know the sender or caller? Seem too good to be true? It’s probably a phishing attack.
  • Know the signs. Does the e-mail contain a vague salutation, spelling or grammatical errors, an urgent request, and/or an offer that seems impossibly good? Click that delete button.
  • Verify the sender. Check the sender’s e-mail address to make sure it’s legitimate. If it appears that your institution’s help desk is asking you to click on a link to increase your mailbox quota, but the sender is “UniversityHelpDesk@yahoo.com,” it’s a phishing message.
  • Don’t be duped by aesthetics. Phishing e-mails often contain convincing logos, links to actual company websites, legitimate phone numbers, and e-mail signatures of actual employees. However, if the message is urging you to take action — especially action such as sending sensitive information, clicking on a link, or downloading an attachment — exercise caution and look for other telltale signs of phishing attacks. Don’t hesitate to contact the company directly; they can verify legitimacy and may not even be aware that their name is being used for fraud.
  • Never, ever share your password. Did we say never? Yup, we mean never. Your password is the key to your identity, your data, and your classmates’ and colleagues’ data. It is for your eyes only. Your institution’s help desk or IT department will never ask you for your password.
  • Avoid opening links and attachments from unknown senders. Get into the habit of typing known URLs into your browser. Don’t open attachments unless you’re expecting a file from someone. Give them a call if you’re suspicious.
  • When you’re not sure, call to verify. Let’s say you receive an e-mail claiming to be from someone you know — a friend, colleague, or even the president of your college or university. Cybercriminals often spoof addresses to convince you, then request that you perform an action such as transfer funds or provide sensitive information. If something seems off about the e-mail, call them at a known number listed in your institution’s directory to confirm the request.
  • Don’t talk to strangers! Receive a call from someone you don’t know? Are they asking you to provide information or making odd requests? Hang up the phone and report it to the help desk.
  • Don’t be tempted by abandoned flash drives. Cybercriminals may leave flash drives lying around for victims to pick up and insert, thereby unknowingly installing malware on their computers. You might be tempted to insert a flash drive only to find out the rightful owner, but be wary — it could be a trap.
  • See someone suspicious? Say something. If you notice someone suspicious walking around or “tailgating” someone else, especially in an off-limits area, call campus safety.

(This content was provided by Educause.)

Major Banner Updates Coming

0 Commentsby   |  01.26.17  |  Uncategorized

We are excited to announce that the first phase of major improvements to administrative Banner are coming in February.  Most know “administrative Banner” by one or more of the following names: Big Banner, Internet Native Banner, INB, Banner-Banner and Oracle Banner.  The next generation of the Banner platform, known as Banner Extensible Ecosystem or simply Banner XE, will significantly improve your ability to use Banner.  Once all phases of the project are completed, Banner will be completely web-based with no Java requirement. The Phase 1 update will include:

  1. Application Navigator – This new navigation component will help users navigate between INB and the new Banner XE forms.
  2. Banner General – Forms that begin with the letter G will move to the new web-based interface with Banner XE.

We intend to upgrade all of the Banner modules to XE by the end of 2017, which will require significant work in the coming months.

UPDATE on 2/9/2017: Ellucian has started rebranding the next release of Banner as “Banner 9” rather than Banner XE.  We may use Banner 9 and Banner XE interchangeably for some period of time since this is a recent development after calling it “Banner XE” for the last few years.

 

 

 

December 2016

0 Commentsby   |  01.05.17  |  Uncategorized

December 2016 by the numbers:

  • 107 end-user support requests resolved
  • 55 development and administration issues resolved
  • 57 development and administration issues created
  • projects in-progress
  • project completed
  • 3 projects requested
  • 99.92% average uptime

2016 by the numbers:

  • 1,803 end-user support requests resolved (84 more than 2015)
  • 950 development and administration issues resolved (96 more than 2015)
  • 1,144 development and administration issues created
  • 51 project completed
  • 99.9% average uptime

Keep What’s Private, Private

You exist in digital form all over the Internet. It is thus important to ensure that the digital you matches what you are intending to share. It is also critical to guard your privacy — not only to avoid embarrassment, but also to protect your identity and finances!  Here are specific steps you can take to protect your online information, identity, and privacy.

What is going on?

  • New Systems Analyst –  We are excited to announce the hiring of a new Systems Analyst, Titus Vesel, who started on January 3rd.  We look forward to training and on-boarding Titus in the coming weeks.
  • Student Life communication – Student Life is introducing a new event communication site that will be integrated with myACU.  The new site will replace and enhance the “On the Hill” area in myACU (aka login ads). The new site and functionality will go live soon.
  • Spring 2017 term preparation – We are busy preparing for the start of the Spring 2017 term, which includes installing ACU Blogs updates, configuring meal plans, and setting up ID card access for campus buildings.
  • Banner updates – We are working to upgrade the administrative side of Banner (aka Big Banner, Internet Native Banner and INB) to the new Banner XE web interface.  The first update, targeted for February, will provide an enhanced interface to Banner General forms that is completely web-based.  Use and support of Banner will improve significantly as a result of the removal of the Java client requirement. We intend to upgrade all of the Banner modules to XE by the end of 2017, which will require significant work in the coming months.

 

Keep What’s Private, Private

0 Commentsby   |  01.03.17  |  Uncategorized

You exist in digital form all over the Internet. It is thus important to ensure that the digital you matches what you are intending to share. It is also critical to guard your privacy — not only to avoid embarrassment, but also to protect your identity and finances!

Following are specific steps you can take to protect your online information, identity, and privacy.

  • Use a unique password for each site. Hackers often use previously compromised information to access other sites. Choosing unique passwords keeps that risk to a minimum.
  • Use a password manager. Using an encrypted password manager to store your passwords makes it easy to access and use a unique password for each site.
  • Know what you are sharing. Check the privacy settings on all of your social media accounts; some even include a wizard to walk you through the settings. Always be cautious about what you post publicly.
  • Guard your date of birth and telephone number. These are key pieces of information used for verification, and you should not share them publicly. If an online service or site asks you to share this critical information, consider whether it is important enough to warrant it.
  • Keep your work and personal presences separate. Your employer has the right to access your e-mail account, so you should use an outside service for private e-mails. This also helps you ensure uninterrupted access to your private e-mail and other services if you switch employers.
  • There are no true secrets online. Use the postcard or billboard test: Would you be comfortable with everyone reading a message or post? If not, don’t share it.

(This content was provided by Educause.)

November 2016

0 Commentsby   |  12.06.16  |  Uncategorized

November 2016 by the numbers:

  • 124 end-user support requests resolved
  • 58 development and administration issues resolved
  • 78 new development and administration issues created
  • projects in-progress
  • project completed
  • 1 project requested
  • 99.92% average uptime
  • 20% of myACU sessions were from mobile and tablet devices for Fall 2016

Did you know?

The type of information shared on social media can provide fodder for phishing attacks and even identity theft, or allow people to make assumptions about you based on the groups that you are affiliated with. As a result, keep these dos and don’ts in mind when sharing online.

What else is going on?

  • Personnel changes –  We are in the final stage of hiring a new Systems Analyst to replace Brennan Turner, who is moving into a programming position.  We intend to have someone hired and ready to start in early January.
  • Student Life communication – We are working with Student Life to implement a new event communication site that will be integrated with myACU.  The new site will replace and enhance the “On the Hill” area in myACU (aka login ads). The new site and functionality will go live in early January.
  • Banner improvements – We have successfully deployed multiple Banner XE applications to production this year, including Employee Profile, Student Advising Profile and Faculty Grade Entry.  All of these self-service applications are available through the Banner link in myACU and provide a glimpse of enhancements that are on the horizon.  Our next set of applications include Banner Student Registration XE as well as the first part of Banner administrative forms (aka Big Banner, Internet Native Banner or INB).

See November 2016 – Resolved Issues for more details.

 

Managing Your Online Reputation

0 Commentsby   |  12.02.16  |  Security

You should understand how to present yourself on social networking sites and how to safeguard your information. What many may consider temporary or fleeting will most likely remain on the Internet forever. As a result, keep these dos and don’ts in mind when sharing online.

Dos

  • Ask questions about who can access the information you are posting online, who controls and owns the information, and what is shared with third party.
  • Maintain a backup of the content you post on professional networking sites (e.g., LinkedIn).
  • Understand the default privacy settings on the social networking sites you use and how to change them to match your comfort level.
  • Keep your personal information private. Assess whether it’s necessary to share sensitive information such as your birthday, mailing address, phone number, e-mail, mother’s maiden name, or Social Security number.
  • Be cautious about accepting requests to connect online. Connect only to people you trust who will not misuse the information you post.
  • Check the location settings on photos and videos you post to social networking sites.
  • Avoid joining online groups where you don’t know all the members or what they stand for.
  • Use passphrases to protect your social media accounts. A passphrase is a set of words that create a phrase that is 20 to 30 characters long.

Don’ts

  • Don’t share too much information that could be used to complete a profile about you. For example, share your birthday, but not the year you were born. Or share your hometown, but not the address where you live.
  • Don’t share any information that is being used for verification purposes such as your mother’s maiden name, the name of your first pet, or the street where first lived. Consider making up alternate answers to those questions that only you would know.
  • Don’t post when you are traveling or going out of town on vacation. It’s an open invitation letting criminals know that you are in a different location and that your home is vacant.
  • Don’t post photos of inappropriate or illegal activities.
  • Don’t click on attachments or links without checking the source.
  • Don’t “check in” to every place you visit. That information could be used to identify you in a vulnerable location.
  • Don’t use weak passwords, and never share your passwords!

(This content was provided by Educause.)