Archive for May, 2017

April 2017

0 Commentsby   |  05.04.17  |  Banner, Security

April 2017 by the numbers:

  • 192 end-user support requests resolved (new record for month of April)
  • 117 development and administration issues resolved (new record for month of April)
  • 126 development and administration issues created
  • 11 projects in-progress
  • project completed
  • 5 projects requested
  • 99.82% average uptime

Step Up to Stronger Passwords

A password is often all that stands between you and sensitive data. It’s also often all that stands between a cybercriminal and your account. Here are tips to help you create stronger passwords, manage them more easily, and take one further step to protect against account theft.

Banner 9

We successfully updated to Banner General 9 on April 7th and Banner Human Resources 9 on May 1st.  In the next seven weeks, we will upgrade Finance and Student, which will move us past the half-way point in the update process.  We are developing a timeline for the remaining Administrative Banner 9 updates as well as Self-Service Banner 9 updates.  We are still targeting completion of all Administrative Banner updates by the end of 2017.

What else is going on?

  • Custom Administrative Banner forms – We must migrate custom forms to Banner 9, which requires a significant investment in work and/or dollars.  A custom form is a form that was created by ACU programmers and is identified by the letter Z in the second place of the seven-letter acronym.  We are gathering feedback from various users to help us determine if forms need to persist or can be retired in favor of baseline functionality in the Banner platform.
  • New Student Orientation (NSO) course – We partnered with the Academic Advising Center to automatically enroll NSO registrants in a Canvas course that will help prepare incoming students for their time at ACU.  Students are automatically added to this course once they register for one of the NSO orientation sessions.
  • Cybersecurity – The security of the services we administer and support is a crucial element of our work.  This includes routine activities, such as proactively addressing vulnerabilities, applying application updates, and monitoring application activity. In the last month, we collaborated with a third-party security audit firm to complete a security audit, which will help us better protect our users and services.

 

Step Up to Stronger Passwords

0 Commentsby   |  05.01.17  |  Security

A password is often all that stands between you and sensitive data. It’s also often all that stands between a cybercriminal and your account. Below are tips to help you create stronger passwords, manage them more easily, and take one further step to protect against account theft.

  • Always: Use a unique password for each account so one compromised password does not put all of your accounts at risk of takeover.
  • Good: A good password is 10 or more characters in length, with a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters, plus numbers and/or symbols — such as pAMPh$3let. Complex passwords can be challenging to remember for even one site, let alone using multiple passwords for multiple sites; strong passwords are also difficult to type on a smartphone keyboard (for an easy password management option, see “best” below).
  • Better: A passphrase uses a combination of words to achieve a length of 20 or more characters. That additional length makes its exponentially harder for hackers to crack, yet a passphrase is easier for you to remember and more natural to type. To create a passphrase, generate four or more random words from a dictionary, mix in uppercase letters, and add a number or symbol to make it even stronger — such as rubbishconsiderGREENSwim$3. You’ll still find it challenging to remember multiple passphrases, though, so read on.
  • Best: The strongest passwords are created by password managers — software that generates and keeps track of complex and unique passwords for all of your accounts. All you need to remember is one complex password or passphrase to access your password manager. With a password manager, you can look up passwords when you need them, copy and paste from the vault, or use functionality within the software to log you in automatically. Best practice is to add two-step verification to your password manager account. Keep reading!
  • Step it up! When you use two-step verification (a.k.a., two-factor authentication or login approval), a stolen password doesn’t result in a stolen account. Anytime your account is logged into from a new device, you receive an authorization check on your smartphone or other registered device. Without that second piece, a password thief can’t get into your account. It’s the single best way to protect your account from cybercriminals.

(This content was provided by Educause.)