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Citing Web Content in APA Format

Posted by on Apr 6, 2013 in Q&A | 0 comments

Citing Web Content in APA Format

Have questions about citing web content in your speech bibliography?  We made this short video to provide some answers. Do you have a question about outlines or speeches you’d like us to answer?  Leave us a comment below or on our Facebook page — www.facebook.com/acuspeakingcenter —  to let us know what we can answer for...

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Preparing a Conference Presentation?

Posted by on Oct 24, 2012 in Tips for Speakers | 0 comments

Having your work accepted for presentation at a conference is an exciting accomplishment, but it also means more work in preparing and rehearsing what you will say.  If you have questions, want some advice/feedback, or just want to run through your presentation before the conference, we would love to visit with you in the Speaking Center. The following advice for conference presenters was adapted from Caroline S. Parsons’ Fall 2012 Simply Speaking article: You’ve submitted your paper and it has been accepted at an academic conference – good for you!  Now, the task of preparing what to say and how to say it at the conference begins.   Begin preparing what you will say during the conference as soon as possible, so you have months to think about it before the conference takes place. You put a lot of work into your paper, and now you have an opportunity to talk about it with other peers and colleagues in your discipline.   Before the Conference While structuring the outline of your presentation, focus on its purpose. Be selective about the main points you want to convey. Know how much time you have to speak, so that you can budget the most important information first. Organize your presentation by briefly introducing yourself and by describing the goal of the presentation/paper. Prepare your remarks about any necessary background the audience needs to know. If the audience is already highly knowledgeable, you don’t have to provide a detailed background.   At the Conference Be early to your panel presentation. If possible, get an idea of who will likely be in the audience. Sometimes, it is important to change strategy (e.g., amount of background and details, formality of language) according to audience.   Make sure technology works before beginning your presentation. Beware of Murphy’s Law of Technology: if the projector does not want to cooperate, the show must go on. Be prepared to go low-tech if necessary. If you intend to hand out any material (e.g., maps, tables, questionnaires, the paper itself), think about how and when it is best to distribute it.   Present your ideas with confidence.  Remember, your paper was selected as part of an important conversation and your audience wants to hear what you have to offer to that conversation. Conclude your presentation by suggesting some points for discussion with the audience.   If you prepare a PowerPoint presentation, include only key points and assume each slide takes at least two minutes. Don’t overdo color & design. Make the font size large, at least 20 point size. Limit text animation and sound effects.   Time management is essential for a professional presentation. If time is running out while you are presenting, skip unnecessary details and state that you will be available after the presentation if someone wishes to get more information from you. During rehearsals, time yourself to make sure you are able to present the most relevant information.   If your paper is selected for a Scholar-to-Scholar poster session, use your poster to provide a clear and explicit take-home message. Be prepared to stand beside your poster and to answer questions from convention attendees. The poster should provide a similar structure to a research paper: an abstract, introduction (i.e., brief rationale or review of relevant research), method section, results section, discussion/limitations, and a conclusion or summary. Keep text to the bare essentials and stick to the most important ideas. You can convey details via discussion when...

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Congrats Class of 2012

Posted by on May 16, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Congrats Class of 2012

This semester, the Speaking Center is excited to congratulate three of our staff members on graduating from ACU.   Chandler Harris (pictured right) 2011-2012 Speaking Center Assistant Director MA in Communication               Randy Woods (pictured right) 2010-2012 Speaking Center Consultant MA in Communication           Katie Singleton (pictured right) 2011-2012 Speaking Center Senior Scholar BS in...

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Spring 2012 Public Speaking Contest Finalists

Posted by on May 16, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Spring 2012 Public Speaking Contest Finalists

Each semester, the Communication Department and Speaking Center host a public speaking contest for all students enrolled in COMS 211.  Each section selects a speaker to represent them in the competition, and after one preliminary round, six finalists are named. This semester’s finalists included (L to R): Adrianna Smith (Finalist), Toni Maisano (Finalist), Lindsay Palmer (2nd Place), Will Rogers (1st Place), Tim Holt (Finalist), and Hagen Little (3rd Place) Congratulations to these students for their hard work this...

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SC Staff Presents at Regional Conference

Posted by on May 16, 2012 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on SC Staff Presents at Regional Conference

SC Staff Presents at Regional Conference

ACU’s Speaking Center staff members presented work at the 103rd annual meeting of the Eastern Communication Association in Boston this April.   Krystal Fogle (pictured on right), junior communication major, presented her paper titled “The Doctor’s Prescription: A Rhetorical Analysis of Dr. Who” at the Undergraduate Scholars Conference       Speaking Center staff members (L to R) Chandler Harris, Randy Woods, Cassey Owens, Emily Adams, Emily Bushnell, and Ashley Wheeler, all graduate students in the Communication Department, participated in a panel about transitions in communication centers.  Their presentation focused on the experience of moving into a collaborative space.       Great work,...

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