New books added to online digital repository

Several books are now available for full-text browsing and download in our Stone-Campbell Books page.  These materials relate to the history of Churches of Christ and Christian Churches in the United States in the early nineteenth through mid twentieth century.  Here are five of our most recent additions, check back often for more.

Bales-Teller Debate on the Existence of God (1948)

Front cover, Bales-Teller Debate on the Existence of God, 1948. https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/574

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R. H. Boll, Christ’s Teaching on Prayer [ca. 1960]

R. H. Boll, Christ’s teaching on Prayer [ca. 1960]. https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/575

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Lipscomb, Christian Unity: How Promoted, How Destroyed (1916)

David Lipscomb, Christian Unity: How Promoted, How Destroyed (1916). https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/576

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G. H. P. Showalter and Leslie G. Thomas, Church Directory and List of Preachers of Churches of Christ (1949)

G. H. P. Showalter and Leslie G. Thomas, Church Directory and List of Preachers of Churches of Christ (1949). https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/577

G. H. P. Showalter and Leslie G. Thomas, Church Directory and List of Preachers of Churches of Christ (1949). https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/577

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jesse P. Sewell and George A. Klingman, Class Notes on the Shorter Epistles (1920).

Jesse P. Sewell and George A. Klingman, Class Notes on the Shorter Epistles (1920). https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/578

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isaac Errett, Our Position [ca. 1900].

Isaac Errett, Our Position [ca. 1900]. https://digitalcommons.acu.edu/crs_books/579

 

 

Digital Repository reaches milestone

In July we passed a milestone when our online digital repository saw its 500,000th download.  Sometime late last week someone somewhere located an item, whether by browsing or through a focused search, that interested them and they downloaded it.  I don’t know what they downloaded and we can’t know what use they might make of it.

The map below presents basic usage data in a compelling way.  The dots represent numbers of downloads.  The larger the dot the more downloads in that area.  I find it compelling because it demonstrates the world-wise reach, and therefore the global potential for impact of the materials we host.

Special Collections was involved very early in the development and population of the repository, and we are grateful that through it our materials have found a wide audience.  Yet what we have online is just a fraction of our holdings.  There are many more items in the pipeline.  Some are ready to be scanned, some have been scanned and are in post-processing and quality-control.  And new material comes in all the time which needs to be processed and cataloged.  Some of that material will make its way online in due time.

If you have downloaded (or viewed, or listened to or watched) our materials, thank you.  Please stay tuned to this blog for forthcoming announcements of additions to the repository.

Usage stat map, DigitalCommons.acu.edu, September 2014-July 2020

South China Chimes (1937-1938) now available online

Special Collections and Archives is pleased to announce seven issues of a rare early twentieth-century periodical are now available online for full-text browsing and download.

Though only four pages (one sheet of paper folded once) South China Chimes is rich in information about the work of missionaries E. L. Broaddus and Ethel Mattley.  Given the circumstances of the war, there are fascinating, chilling, and poignant comments such as this note from the February-March 1938 issue:

We are continually being asked why we do not leave Hongkong and return to America until the trouble is over.  I think you would feel very different about it if you could realize the great need of proper teaching at such a time as this.  We have greater opportunities than ever to preach the gospel to the unsaved and many of them have more time to think on these things than they ever have or perhaps ever will have. To say the least the Seed must be sown and the Lord will look after the development.*

The following month Broaddus wrote this about Ethel Mattley:

After months of waiting for conditions to improve Miss Mattley decided to return to Kwongsi and go ahead with the work. She was not at all well here due to asthma and the higher altitude should relieve that and she will be able to carry on with the work among the women and children in spite of the war spirit and training of soldiers. The native workers and Christians need encouragement in such times as these and there may be an opportunity to even reach some with the gospel.**

South China Chimes, volume 11, number 3, April 1938. Center for Restoration Studies, Special Collections and Archives, Abilene Christian University.

Readers of these few issues of this scarce periodical will find several more similar comments, plus items of news and notes about happenings among Churches of Christ in China.  Historians of missions and missiology, students of intellectual and social history, and anyone interested in the history of Churches of Christ will find these issues of South China Chimes a welcome addition to their palette of source material.  We thank Dr. Stephen Crowder for making these issues available as part of our growing collection of digitized print materials pertaining to Churches of Christ, currently with over 500 books, tracts, pamphlets from across the Stone-Campbell movement available online.

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*E. L. Broaddus, “Opportunities in Hongkong,” So. China Chimes, 11(2), February-March 1938, p. 1.

**E. L. Broaddus, “Miss Mattley Returns to Kwongsi,” So. China Chimes, 11(3), April 1938, p. 1.